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Tools for Digital Nomads

Written by Joshua Fuglsang on .

Julie repairing her old MacBook Pro

Overview

For my travelling and indie dev career I have put together a suite of services to support my work. This is an article to describe the software services I use, how I use them, and what I like about them. A lot of these tools I have researched independently, others I came across during my career working for a tech startup.

The Tools

gSuite (Gmail, Google Galendar)

For Email and Calendars I use the gSuite toolchain. There are free alternatives that you can use instead, such as Zoho, but the quality and extensiveness of gSuite is unparalleled. For the cost of a meal per month I am happy to pay for it.

Dropbox

I really love Dropbox particularly the scan document feature; it’s extremely useful for managing receipts. It also has a nice feature for providing offline access to documents. Which I use for having quick reliable access to itineraries and insurance papers.

Evernote

For notes, journals, and article drafts I use Evernote. It’s good for syncing between my phone and my laptop. I would prefer not to use Evernote as I don’t like the way it formats the files. I would like to use an app that could easily sync markdown files between my files, but haven’t found a good one yet. Maybe I’ll build one. :)

Todoist

Todoist has been my go to task management app for a couple of years now; it’s simple and does what you expect. I also like that it works offline as I won’t always have a reliable internet connection.

Atom

For all of my writing and website coding on my laptop I am using Atom. It has a plethora of plugins so I can tailor it to suit my purposes. I also like that I can hotswap themes. So if I am in a sunny environment I can switch to a light coloured theme that is easier to read.

iTerm2 + zsh (oh-my-zsh)

iTerm2 and zsh make for an amazing terminal experience on the macOS. You can extend it far beyond the standard terminal experience. Plus with the themes it looks great. As an alternative you can consider using Fish.

Conclusion

Thanks for reading, I use a lot of tools beyond this, but these are the major ones that I use everyday. If you have any other suggestions then I’d love to hear them in the comments below.